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Article Credit: Sam Wong 08 April 2013 (Communications and Public Affairs Imperial College)

Magic mushrooms trial for depression delayed by red tape

"The current legislation is stopping the benefits of these drugs being explored and for the last 40 years we have missed really interesting opportunities to help patients." Professor David Nutt

The UK's first clinical trial using the hallucinogenic ingredient in magic mushrooms for treating depression is being delayed due to UK and EU rules on the use of illegal drugs in research.

Professor David Nutt, president of the British Neuroscience Association (BNA) and Edmond J Safra Professor of Neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College London, told BNA's Festival of Neuroscience yesterday that although the Medical Research Council has awarded a grant for the study, Government regulations controlling the licensing of illegal drugs in research and EU guidelines on Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) have stalled the start of the trial, which was expected to start this year. He is calling for a change to the regulations.


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Article Credit: Sam Wong 24 January 2012 (Communications and Public Affairs Imperial College)

Magic mushrooms' effects illuminated in brain imaging studies

The affects of Psilocybin acting on the brain seen for the first time

Brain scans of people taking psilocybin have given scientists the most detailed picture to date of how psychedelic drugs work.

Brain scans of people under the influence of the psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, have given scientists the most detailed picture to date of how psychedelic drugs work. The findings of two studies being published in scientific journals this week identify areas of the brain where activity is suppressed by psilocybin and suggest that it helps people to experience memories more vividly.

In the first study, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), 30 healthy volunteers had psilocybin infused into their blood while inside magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, which measure changes in brain activity. The scans showed that activity decreased in "hub" regions of the brain - areas that are especially well-connected with other areas.

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Article Credit: by Francesca Davenport 03 July 2014 (Communications and Public Affairs Imperial College)

New study discovers biological basis for magic mushroom 'mind expansion'

Psychedelic drugs are unique among other psychoactive chemicals in that users often describe 'expanded consciousness,' including enhanced associations, vivid imagination and dream-like states.

New research shows that our brain displays a similar pattern of activity during dreams as it does during a mind-expanding drug trip.

Psychedelic drugs such as LSD and magic mushrooms can profoundly alter the way we experience the world but little is known about what physically happens in the brain. New research, published in Human Brain Mapping, has examined the brain effects of the psychedelic chemical in magic mushrooms, called psilocybin, using data from brain scans of volunteers who had been injected with the drug

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Article Credit: The Beckley Foundation - June 14, 2012

Are We Finally Reawakening to the Profound Healing Properties of Psychedelics?

"There was an explosion of creativity, cultural change, and of course, a few bad trips. Steve Jobs, the Beatles, John Coltrane, Jack Nicholson, Ram Das, Andrew Weil and many others experienced and shared their own personal magical mystery tours."

Slowly but surely, we may be reaching success in a determined and long-time legal effort to unleash the curative powers of psychedelic drugs in America. There is a tremendous need for alternative approaches to the existing models of drugs and therapy. Tens of thousands of soldiers have returned from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan with symptoms of PTSD. Many alcoholics and drug addicts fail to find success in 12-step programs. Research shows that psychedelics have the potential to help many of them, as well as the victims of rape, molestation and family violence.

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